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About Traditional Art / Professional Patricia van LubeckFemale/New Zealand Recent Activity
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Alvaro :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 1 1 The famous one :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 22 3 The same one :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 39 12 Edgar :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 3 6 The lucky one :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 50 2 Errol :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 4 3 Oriana :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 6 3 The cheeky one :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 14 3 The shy one :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 15 10 Cloud picker :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 12 3 The weird one :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 72 14 The Lost Ones :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 33 5 The Happy One :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 43 13 The Brave One :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 2,351 207 Can't take my eyes off of you. :iconvanlubeck:vanlubeck 34 20
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When painting the ice landscape a friend asked me why I was more enthusiastic in making one painting than the other. In other words; why one painting comes to me easier than some other one.
Some painters theatrically cry out that their paintings are their children and it's a burden to sell them. For me, after a certain point, my paintings needs to produce dough.

That's not to say I do not love my own creations. I'm as blind as a mother for her children; my creations are the best in the world! Parts we are not satisfied with, we cover with the cloak of charity. But my paintings are no kids that I can not release. When they are done they have to spread their wings. Buzz off and earn money for mama. Goodbye, I have your picture.

My relationship with a paintingNevertheless, of course I fully understand that emotion of some painters, but I rather prefer to compare my paintings with mature friendships instead of children. Some friendships are short and intense, like Cyphomandra vitra. From the very beginning our love was grand and compelling. Everything we did together went well and we were great together. At least, from my perspective I thought she was great and I couldn't stop talking about her. Such a rugged and uncomplicated background coupled with the clear and frank countenance. Her strange deformities were her original view on the world and that purple glass was almost better than rose-colored glasses! And seen from her view; Well ... it was not without my creative urge she was living.
But after a stormy affair we easily went our separate ways.
The good memories and the pictures are enough. And a new love is waiting. As well as for her as for me.

My relationship with a paintingTaxus glacialis (that cold icy landscape) however, became a long and difficult relationship. Is it because some friends are too much like yourself? Their character is too transparent to you and you know their tricks too well. But that is also the reason you can't criticize them. They don't surprise you.
If this kind of painting is appeared on my easel I notice I try to postpone the confrontation. My inspiration to paint is fading. If the conversation finally is happening, mostly it turned out not too bad, but ... as soon as the end of the agreement is in view, I already waiting at the door with my coat on. Sorry, session time is over!
The strange thing is that such a kind of 'marriage of convenience' however, doesn't predicts anything about his success if the painting is launched in the public world.


My relation with a paintingOne of my first serious paintings was a big struggle too. I even want to call it a fight. But in the end, it became one of my most populair ones in that series. Once the size of 'The trash bin' was rectangular. During painting those endless little bricks I got so sick of them that I decided to go in denial (you know; that unattractive part of the character you cover with the cloak of charity). There was still a long way of bricks to go on the left part of the painting, but I took the saw and cut it of to a square format. Those days I painted on wood. After that brute force the painting had to sit facewards against the wall for years, before I finished it.

I still make repetitive patterns. But nowadays I don't 'deny' them anymore. I cope with them. Yes, getting older means getting milder, isn't it? Also in relations.

  • Listening to: audio book

When painting the ice landscape a friend asked me why I was more enthusiastic in making one painting than the other. In other words; why one painting comes to me easier than some other one.
Some painters theatrically cry out that their paintings are their children and it's a burden to sell them. For me, after a certain point, my paintings needs to produce dough.

That's not to say I do not love my own creations. I'm as blind as a mother for her children; my creations are the best in the world! Parts we are not satisfied with, we cover with the cloak of charity. But my paintings are no kids that I can not release. When they are done they have to spread their wings. Buzz off and earn money for mama. Goodbye, I have your picture.

My relationship with a paintingNevertheless, of course I fully understand that emotion of some painters, but I rather prefer to compare my paintings with mature friendships instead of children. Some friendships are short and intense, like Cyphomandra vitra. From the very beginning our love was grand and compelling. Everything we did together went well and we were great together. At least, from my perspective I thought she was great and I couldn't stop talking about her. Such a rugged and uncomplicated background coupled with the clear and frank countenance. Her strange deformities were her original view on the world and that purple glass was almost better than rose-colored glasses! And seen from her view; Well ... it was not without my creative urge she was living.
But after a stormy affair we easily went our separate ways.
The good memories and the pictures are enough. And a new love is waiting. As well as for her as for me.

My relationship with a paintingTaxus glacialis (that cold icy landscape) however, became a long and difficult relationship. Is it because some friends are too much like yourself? Their character is too transparent to you and you know their tricks too well. But that is also the reason you can't criticize them. They don't surprise you.
If this kind of painting is appeared on my easel I notice I try to postpone the confrontation. My inspiration to paint is fading. If the conversation finally is happening, mostly it turned out not too bad, but ... as soon as the end of the agreement is in view, I already waiting at the door with my coat on. Sorry, session time is over!
The strange thing is that such a kind of 'marriage of convenience' however, doesn't predicts anything about his success if the painting is launched in the public world.


My relation with a paintingOne of my first serious paintings was a big struggle too. I even want to call it a fight. But in the end, it became one of my most populair ones in that series. Once the size of 'The trash bin' was rectangular. During painting those endless little bricks I got so sick of them that I decided to go in denial (you know; that unattractive part of the character you cover with the cloak of charity). There was still a long way of bricks to go on the left part of the painting, but I took the saw and cut it of to a square format. Those days I painted on wood. After that brute force the painting had to sit facewards against the wall for years, before I finished it.

I still make repetitive patterns. But nowadays I don't 'deny' them anymore. I cope with them. Yes, getting older means getting milder, isn't it? Also in relations.

  • Listening to: audio book
If the first pencilling is my least favourite part, I find mixing the colours the most fun part.
I never use colours directly from the tubes, but always mix them.
For example; I have 5 tubes of various reds, but they all react in a different way when adding white. The pink of a flamingo is different from the pink of your nose. But for skin tones I need to add even more colours, like green (to reduce the redness). Or ochres, to get human pink, instead of dolly pink.

During the detailing in a later stage of the painting, I don’t need large amounts of the desired colours. Freshly mixed oil paints works the best. After a few hours you’ll notice the dabs are losing their viscosity. So, mixing exactly the right set of colours a couple of times a day, can be quite time-consuming too. It doesn’t make a difference if you need tiny or large amounts.
Sometimes I’ve mixed my colours too late in the day, or I got interrupted for a while. It’s annoying to spill that perfect mix, because overnight the dabs become useless. Covering the mixes with old lids doesn’t save them. Probably there is still too much air around the dabs.

That’s where the emptied strips of painkillers come in. The holes snug the paint in as much as possible and sometimes I even can close the left foil! Otherwise covering with something flat does the job too.
From now on I will try to open the strips without ruining the foil.
Hopefully I’ll get a lot of headaches in the near future. Yeah!

Painkillers by vanlubeck
  • Listening to: audio book
Besides the Kalahari desert, another impressive spot in the former German colony Namibia was ‘das Sperrgebiet’. That means ‘forbidden area’ and it is a mining area for diamonds.
I was not especially interested in the diamonds (although for the first time in my life I got fascinated by the beauty of all kinds of minerals), but I was charmed by the desolated atmosphere of the abandoned settlements of the miners.
One of the villages is open for tourists and is named Kolmanskop. These days it is called ‘ghost town’. In the silent, hot weather with a gusty wind what caused a kind of yellow/grey hazy view that was a perfect characterization. All the buildings were deteriorated, but accessible for visitors. A true paradise for photographers and location scouts.
Kolmanskop, Namibia by vanlubeck  Kolmanskop, Namibia by vanlubeck  Kolmanskop, Namibia by vanlubeck

image 1. The silence was loud
image 2. Beyond the job of vacuum cleaning
image 3. A 'naturally sandblasted' window

Luderitz, namibia by vanlubeck  Sossusvlei, Namibia by vanlubeck  close to the Sossusvlei, Namibia by vanlubeck

image 1. 15 minutes from the ghost town, the colour is back!
image 2. A few days later in the Sossusvlei
image 3. A cool down in a shady crevice, with even fish in the puddle (it's still the desert)

Looking at these images it’s not hard to find out where my inspiration for my painting 'The same one' came from. At least the source of the house is quite clear and maybe the silence of the desert has crept in the painting too.

The same one by vanlubeck
  • Listening to: audio book
  • Eating: apple

In October/November '12 me and my friend travelled to South-Africa to visit my Dad and to make a camper trip through Namibia.
One of the things I really have to mention in this art blog, is that the story of one of my paintings, now has become to life …

    When I painted Populus Flucta in 2006, the base of this idea were the unique nests build by birds that live in the Kalahari desert. The nests are actually enormous hollow rooms and can contain sometimes more than 100 pairs of birds and the nests can be used by several generations of birds. I had never seen this nests in real. I only had read about it.

populus flucta by vanlubeck    Now, 6 years later, we camped at the edge of the Kalahari desert! There was no fence or a border; just the remote camp site and ‘everything out there’. It wasn’t a difficult decision to set the alarm clock just before sun rise (otherwise it was too hot for a long walk) and sneak into the wide and silent desert. The sky was beautifully lilac and the animals were not to sleep yet.
After an hour I saw a HUGE one.
They also nesting in living trees by vanlubeck A large nest of the birds called 'social weavers' by vanlubeck Here you see all the 'doors' to the seperate rooms by vanlubeck Sometimes the birds choose a pole by vanlubeck

One of the other fantastic trees were the ‘Quivers’ (for the Dutchies; Kokerboom sounds nice too).
The trunks looks a bit like my Agaricia Bullio!

agaricia bullio by vanlubeck The trunk of a quiver by vanlubeck and their beautiful crown of succulent leaves by vanlubeck I admit ... I'm a tree hugger by vanlubeck Some artistic objects in the Quivers park by vanlubeck






  • Listening to: audio book
  • Eating: apple

Although in the end my visit to Taiwan (the blog before the previous blog), was absolutely one of the milestones in my life, the architecture of Taipei was not attractive to me straight away. It took me a couple of days to force my way into the somewhat impervious face of the city. The buildings are a bit gloomy and dark, without much windows. The most used form of decoration is covering a building from top to bottom under a pancake of small tiles. The cloudy weather didn’t help either.
I have been in Singapore and Hong Kong, but I can’t remember I got the same feeling of oddness as in Taipei. For me it was a atmosphere of a futuristic scene build in the fifties. It was not a turn off, but more a kind of intriguing. A mix of spooky and fairy. Certainly in the more silent neighbourhoods.

One of the weird buildings in Tapei by vanlubeck  The buildings in Taiwan could be quite gloomy by vanlubeck  Tiles, tiles ... and not much windows by vanlubeck
And then sometimes, in the middle of a spooky alley with never a second of sunlight, right beside the assembly point of trash bins I saw a extremely colourful, glittery and warm shelter with a mini-temple. Or a tiny, but loudly winking little candy shop hidden in an almost black dirty street full of the exhausts of the airco’s.

Of course there also were the new blocks and the business centre, that certainly had a more lighter and opener atmosphere. There you find the outdoor cafés, the chain shops and the markets, but a lot of the authentic life of the Taiwanese people occurs a bit more ‘behind the scene’ as we European people are used to. But at the other hand; I am sure that is only on the first sight. The sight of the ignorant foreigner who don’t know his way. The Taiwanese people themselves are adorable!
Taiwan is certainly a land I want to know better. This time I’ve only seen Taipei city, but there is so much more I want to experience.

    Suddenly, in the greyness, the smell of incense by vanlubeck  Or the bright lights of a candy shop by vanlubeck


  • Listening to: audio book
  • Eating: apple

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vanlubeck
Patricia van Lubeck
Artist | Professional | Traditional Art
New Zealand
My recently created oil paintings are all about 'individualism'. About human characteristics translated into landscapes
Most of the people can associate themselves with one of the trees in the paintings. The trees are performing like actors.
Every person is gifted with at least one special thing in life, so you easily can personify yourself with one of the actors. As the brave one, the cheeky one, or the lucky one.
But also if you don't take the titles too literally, you can see the solo acting tree as a leading one in a group, a showing one in a circle of viewers or a guiding one in front of a public. In some way, we all are the one. Even if it is for just once.

And about the portraits: Every portrait is a self-portrait. Not literally on the outside, but they all are separate parts of my character. To be more specific; a magnified version of a piece of my character. Just like an actor digs up something out of the dark corners of his own personality to play a convincing role.

www.vanlubeck.com
www.facebook.com/vanlubeck

A peep in my studio: youtu.be/iXeXcI1NkTQ
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Comments


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:iconcastor1527:
Castor1527 Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2014
Votre galerie est formidable!!!!!
Reply
:iconringshif7er:
Ringshif7er Featured By Owner Jun 9, 2014  Student General Artist
I love your landscapes. The trees are just so alive, somehow :)
Reply
:iconernesto-lomeli:
ernesto-lomeli Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2013
good stuff!
Reply
:iconwebbytoes:
WebbyToes Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
You have such an interesting style! I love the way you create different worlds and plant life.
Reply
:iconoctoflash:
OctoFlash Featured By Owner Apr 19, 2013
amazing work!

one question: are you a lucid dreamer?
Reply
:iconthe-back-of-beyond:
The-Back-of-Beyond Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2012  Student Photographer
I love your work, is really admirable, you have such an unique surreal style. I've always found my inspiration for writing and photography on music, but I think I've found it also on your pantings. There's only one thing to do now :+devwatch:
Reply
:iconzweetchuck:
Zweetchuck Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I think your paintings are om amazing style and quality, its amazing. The concepts aswell are just so serene in a way, almost like its obvious these places exist. The way you paint with such high attention to detail in your own style is also admirable. Keep u pthe great work! :ahoy:
Reply
:iconaquatickworld:
aquaTICKworld Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2012
Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful! I love your art, Patricia!
Reply
:icongubble:
Gubble Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2012
I really love your surreal style. It's like dream worlds.
Reply
:iconzeeekay:
zeeekay Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2012  Student Interface Designer
love ur work
Reply
:iconheartinart:
heartinart Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Great talent and amazing works!
Reply
:iconartbybeverly:
ArtBYbeverly Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Hi Patricia, I admire your talent and your paintings...and Hello from the Bay of Plenty :)
Reply
:iconraipun:
Raipun Featured By Owner May 22, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Heeey, wist je dat ik je hier nog niet was tegengekomen?!!! Wat gek dat ik je nu pas vind! Groetjes, Christiane Vleugels X
Reply
:iconvanlubeck:
vanlubeck Featured By Owner May 7, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Ik kom hier ook niet vaak (zoals je ziet - deze reply is 2 jaar later, hahaha).
Maar vanaf vandaag zal ik het weer netjes bijhouden ;)
Reply
:iconsgdev:
sgdev Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2012
Kiaora! And happy birthday! :wave:
Love your amazing paintings!
Reply
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